Rammstein Du hast lyrics with English translation

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Du You
du hast you have
du hast mich you have me
du hast mich gefragt you have asked me
du hast mich gefragt, und ich hab nichts gesagt you have asked me and I have said nothing
 
Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet Do you want, until death seperates you,
treu ihr sein für alle Tage to be faithful to her for all days
 
Nein No
 
Willst du bis zum Tod, der scheide Do you want, until death, which would seperate,
sie lieben auch in schlechten Tagen to love her, even in bad days
 
Nein No

This song is by and large Rammstein’s most well-known song in their entire library. It is a play on German wedding vows; however, it can be interpreted many different ways. The first lines of the song can have a double meaning; the phrases Du hast and Du hasst mean You have and You hate, respectively, but they are homophones (in the official German it means “you have”). For more info, see the singles page.

 

159 COMMENTS

  1. thats a lot of comments….but I really don’t care what it is in english in German its DU HAST in english I don’t really care the original is DU HAST why would you care what it means in english if its sung in German!!!!!!!!!

  2. I think there is no correct answer on the question:

    What is the only correct meaning of the word?

    This is a game with the worlds. Untill you hear the end of the first sentence, you don’t know what the text is about.

    Have or hate?

    This tension is there for the whole song, and you cannot forget the feeling that it is about hate and not about asking a question…

  3. This translation is correct please stop arguing! I know a little German but i happen to know this one is right!

  4. Hahahaha! Muhahahah!
    UP FOR ANOTHER YEAR OF DISCUSSION!

    Yes, you are wright, Ckhi, but I still agree with Nathaniel..
    Never mind the morons and enjoy the bloody music.
    And yes, it has been said a trillion times before. That is exactly why you should ignore it…;)

  5. Katie
    5:39 pm on February 7th, 2009

    Uh, It’s have… hate is haßt(hasst)… and trust me… I would know…
    —–

    It is have, it has been said -looks at comments- oh about a trillion times that hast is have, and haßt (Hasst, not HaBt, thats something called an Eszett, not a B) If they wanted it to be ‘you hate’ they would have titled it as Du haßt, not Du Hast.
    people who think its hate are just judging by the english translation.
    [this has been a public service announcement by a person with an unpronounceable name]

  6. Rammstein is famous for their puns and double meanings in songs. All those who said hast and hasst are pronounced the same are correct. It is, in fact, a play on wedding vows. So it means one, the other AND both simultaneously. Now still thy tongues and enjoyeth this gift from the gods of music.

  7. Such a long conversation…It took years!
    And you all say exactly the same things. Nonsense, but really funny. I’ve been lauging my ass off!

    Relax, people.
    Although I’m mean enough to enjoy this..
    And yes, awesome song!

    Greetings from the Netherlands

  8. this song means “you have”

    but in english version they change it to “you hate” because they
    enjoy seeing all their fans to fight over silly matters

    XP

  9. I’m LMAO about all the (rather heated) discussion regarding “du hast” meaning either “you hate” or “you have”.
    (hast = have, hasst = hate)

    What I consider the most intrigueing (interesting) line is:
    “Willst du bist zum tot der scheide” which means “do you want, until death of the sheath (vagina)”
    A great play on
    “Willst du bist der tot euch scheidet”!

    (I assume “death of the sheath” is old age, not murder or anything.)

    Much more fun to discuss!

  10. if u literally translate it, it means “u have” but wen they sing the english version they mean “u hate”

  11. Everyone posting a comment is a retard. The entire song is a play on German wedding vows – it even says so on their website. Yes, while the literal translation means “You Have” it is also heard as “You Hate.” Do your research before calling each other out; it only makes you sound stupider than you already are.

  12. I’m sadly born american and never knew any german until i started to listen to Eisbrecher and Rammstein. I have learned a lot from both bands. Du Hast does and always has meant you have and Du Hasst always has meant you hate. no need to argue over it. i say we just listen to them, enjoy the music and drink to one of the best bands ever in the world!

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