Rammstein Liese lyric with English translation

Sonntag auf der Ammerwiese
hütet Gänse brav die Liese
Da kommt Jakob angerannt,
hält eine Sichel in der Hand

Diese schiebt er hin und wieder
dem Lieschen unter Rock und Mieder
Er will sie kosten, will sie zwingen
und der Bub’ wird dazu singen

Liebe Liese, lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Der Jakob darf vom Lieschen lecken
und sie wird nach Birne schmecken
Sich kleine Härchen aufgestellt,
eilen sie zum Weizenfeld

In der Goldflut gut versteckt,
hat er die Liese angesteckt
Hält bis zum Abend sie eng umschlungen
und hat in das Kind gesungen

Liebe Liese lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Liebe Liese, lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Lyric © Rammstein
Sunday at Bunting Meadow
Liese virtuously herds the Geese
Then Jakob comes running up
holding a sickle in his hand

This he pushes here and there
Little Liese under her skirt and bodice
He wants to taste her, wants to force her
and the boy will sing then

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Jakob is allowed to lick little Liese
and it shall taste like pear
Small hairs erected
they hurry to the wheatfield.

In the golden flood* well hidden
He has infected Liese
He held her until the evening, embracing her tightly
and sung into the child

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Translation © Affenknecht.com

* a metaphor for the wheatfield

Submited by Caleb Wilson

58 COMMENTS

  1. Liese is a german female name. But yes it’s also oldschool. It’s often used in Old german fairy tales, the girl who looks after the geese is very often called “Gänse-Liese” It is a short form from Elisabeth, which was a popular name in the past. I would see this song as a story from old times, also because nowadays noone uses a scythe. 😉

    @ramm stein: no “liebe Liese” does not mean gentle love. “liebe” is more like “dear” and Liese is just her name (see above)

    @Thuthut: i think this is just meant like, women taste sweet. ;), it would have suited better if they used plum, because in german plum also stands for female genitalia.

  2. Wouldnt Leibe Leise
    mean “Gentle Love”
    Because I beleive that Leise does mean Gentle.
    and it would also be ironic that the boy in this song is singing “Gentle Love” to the girl he is forcing to have relations with him.

  3. i just want to ask one question, Liese is the girl’s name right? is that a popular german name? also its pronounced “Leezuh” more or less, right?

  4. So, my mother tongue is german 🙂

    “angesteckt” means just infected or contaminated.

    and in fact there is nor childish language in this song, it’s just a little bit old school (ancient) and poetic. Some would never speak like this in the every day life, but Rammstein sometimes use this way of speaking in their songs.

  5. I got a new interpretation on the sentence: “hat er die Liese angesteckt”
    Angestecken might mean something like ”connect to”. “Ein gesteck” is the same as a “connection”, as connecting a cable.
    So it probably means that he is penetration her. Thus the song might be about necrophilia, if Liese is dead after his former “waving” with the scythe. Perhaps that’s a form af his final “subduing” her.

  6. The whole song is sung as to children: “Da kommt Jakob angerannt” is somewhat a childish grammar, as well as saying “der Jakob”, as a noun.

    By the way, the melody, including the whistle accompaniment, is identical to Roter Sand’s, so it gives an interesting different angle of what may be one situation; when Roter Sand is sung from the view of an adult who fought over his lover and Liese – from a view of some twisted affection.

  7. (again)
    One might think about the sentence “Are you friendly not to my”, not as “poetic” but as someone speaking in bad grammar, as to a little child.
    I could be a part of his “subduing her”.

  8. Neither English, nor German, is my mother’s tongue (in fact it’s Swedish), but I’ve tried to do a translation of my own (using a very old German-Swedish dictionary and the faint memory from my school years).
    From this Swedish translation I made one to English.

    “Sunday at the field by Ammer
    (Ammer is a lake, but might also denote a fruit or a bird)
    The good Liese watches over the geese
    Then comes Jacob a-running
    Holding a scythe in the hand

    With this he waves there and again
    Little Liese under skirt and girdle (I’m not really sure how, in fact, Jakob is “waving”. Perhaps he waves in front of her face first, then cuts off her cloths, and then cuts her)
    Ha wants to taste her, wants to subdue her
    And the scoundrel meanwhile begins to sing:

    Dear Liese, forget about the geese
    I want to taste your skin
    Rusty from blood is scythe
    Are you friendly not to me
    (I can’t fully appreciate this last sentence – but perhaps Jacob is trying to make Liese feel ashamed about making the scythe “dirty”)

    Jakob may then lick little Liese
    And she is going to have the flavour of a pear
    Small fluff will be standing straight
    And they hurry to the field of wheat

    In the golden river, well hidden
    He has stuck Liese down/up
    (perhaps with the scythe?)
    Holds her tightly wrapped until evening (with his arms or whatever, but probably with his arms)
    And has sung to the child: (note the switch in tempus from present to past)


  9. “bist Du freundlich nicht zu mir” is just an old poetic way to say “if you are not nice to me”

    Liebe Liese, lass die Gänse,
    ich will von deiner Haut probieren
    Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
    bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

    Oh Dear Liese, leave the geese,
    I want to taste of your skin.
    Blood will turn the Sickle rusty,
    if you are not nice to me.

  10. Just to touch up Micha’s translation:

    On a Sunday in the meadows,
    Liese sheppards Geese,
    Thats when Jakob comes up running,
    holding a sickle in his hand

    He nudges it now and then
    beneath little Lieses skirt and korsett
    He wants to taste her, wants to force her,
    and the boy will sing…

    Dear Liese, let the geese be,
    I want to have the taste of your skin
    Blood has turned this Sickle rusty,
    You aren’t friendly to me

    Jakob’s allowed to lick little Liese
    and she will taste just like a pear
    As the hairs stand on their skin,
    they hurry off to the wheat field.

    In fields of gold, well hidden
    he has infected Liese
    He holds her tightly into the evening, embracing her
    and sang to the child:

    Dear Liese, let the geese be,
    I want to have the taste of your skin
    Blood has turned this Sickle rusty,
    You aren’t friendly to me

    Dear Liese, let the geese be,
    I want to have the taste of your skin
    Blood has turned this Sickle rusty,
    You aren’t friendly to me

  11. Alternate Translation… (Key difference: I think by “Angesteckt” he means make a cut on an artery like you would an animal whos blood you have to drain, he then embraces and holds her until later evening).

    ——–

    On a Sunday in the meadows,
    Liese sheppards over geese,
    Thats when Jakob comes up running,
    holds a sickle in his hand

    This he nudges now and then
    beneath little Lieses skirt and korsett
    He wants to try her, wants to force her,
    and the boy will sing…

    Oh Dear Liese, leave the geese,
    I want to taste of your skin.
    Blood has turned Sickle rusty,
    are you friendly? Not to me.

    Jakob’s allowed to lick little Liese
    and she will taste just like a pear
    As the hairs stand on their skin,
    they hurry off to the wheat field.

    In fields of gold, well hidden
    he has opened (cut) Liese up
    He holds her tight till late evening
    and sang into the child:

    Oh Dear Liese, leave the geese,
    I want to taste of your skin.
    Blood has turned Sickle rusty,
    are you friendly? Not to me.

    Oh Dear Liese, leave the geese,
    I want to taste of your skin.
    Blood has turned Sickle rusty,
    are you friendly? Not to me.

  12. 1) Goldflut must be seen in relation to Weizenfeld because wheatfields are golden. It’s not a a metaphor for the womb.
    2) ““-chen” is the diminutive suffix” – Right, but not a metaphor for her genitalia. It is just meant as belittlement.

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