Rammstein Liese lyric with English translation

Sonntag auf der Ammerwiese
hütet Gänse brav die Liese
Da kommt Jakob angerannt,
hält eine Sichel in der Hand

Diese schiebt er hin und wieder
dem Lieschen unter Rock und Mieder
Er will sie kosten, will sie zwingen
und der Bub’ wird dazu singen

Liebe Liese, lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Der Jakob darf vom Lieschen lecken
und sie wird nach Birne schmecken
Sich kleine Härchen aufgestellt,
eilen sie zum Weizenfeld

In der Goldflut gut versteckt,
hat er die Liese angesteckt
Hält bis zum Abend sie eng umschlungen
und hat in das Kind gesungen

Liebe Liese lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Liebe Liese, lass die Gänse,
ich will von deiner Haut probieren
Vom Blute rostig ist die Sense,
bist du freundlich nicht zu mir

Lyric © Rammstein
Sunday at Bunting Meadow
Liese virtuously herds the Geese
Then Jakob comes running up
holding a sickle in his hand

This he pushes here and there
Little Liese under her skirt and bodice
He wants to taste her, wants to force her
and the boy will sing then

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Jakob is allowed to lick little Liese
and it shall taste like pear
Small hairs erected
they hurry to the wheatfield.

In the golden flood* well hidden
He has infected Liese
He held her until the evening, embracing her tightly
and sung into the child

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Dear Liese, let the geese be,
I want to try your skin
The scythe is rusty from the blood,
if you are not friendly to me.

Translation © Affenknecht.com

* a metaphor for the wheatfield

Submited by Caleb Wilson

58 COMMENTS

  1. I’ve been wondering if Jakob is the man who killed the subject of Roter Sand, and is now trying to claim the dead man’s love, but finding her unwilling, is resorting to rape because he feels he has earned her.

  2. @EVERYONE WHO DEBATES LOGICALLY: I absolutely love this song and most of you really do know what your talking about. And if anyone wants to know the best translation, I think it is probably Micha’s (Don’t quote me on that). This song is beautiful.

  3. @Charismatic Engima yeah but what do you think about the “you are not friendly to me” sentence thats what confuses me is he saying that she is not being nice to him? ..geez i feel dumb right now.

  4. I note how a lot of people seem to think that, just because “the scythe is rusty”, that means the sex was forceful. Even the most well-intentioned first sexual encounter for a lot of girls involves bleeding — it’s just how the parts work down there.

    Also, @Lily — that WAS extremely rude. Insulting your opponent is not a form of logical argument.

  5. I note how a lot of people seem to think that, just because “the scythe is rusty”, that means the sex was forceful. Even the most well-intentioned first sexual encounter for a lot of girls involves bleeding — it’s just how the parts work down there.

  6. @Feursquare With a Canadian IP
    Meh… First of all I must say thank you for seeing the good in me – I thought that I Am actually a “cunt” but according to you I’m just “pretending” to be one so what the hell – I’m gonna wholeheartedly trust your expert view on me.

    @Feursquare With an American IP
    While it’s quite true that the song has certain folklore & fairy-tale allusions as you rightly pointed out, they are by no means biblical:
    Biblical = folktalish/ fairy-talish –> O_o –> in error –> my suggestion about reading the (Un)Holy Book to get an idea what really is biblical.
    These two words are not even remotely the same.

    Also, I’ve kindly answered your question about whether it’s biblical or not… you surely did realize that my answer was ironical ‘cause the adverb “sure” and the hyperbole “idiot” are in an antithetical relation to each other, therefore express the opposite of that which was outwardly stated.
    “Also, “embarrass yourself on the Internet” is an oxymoron.” – 🙂 True. I was in the wrong on this bit. (:

  7. @ Lily There is no need to be like that. You’re not a very pleasant indivdual. xD C’mon doesn’t Rammstein make you want to spread the love? Turn that ( ever permanent) frown upside down! xD

  8. “I’m Sewwy” that I offended you. Some of the lyrics do sound biblical, or at least folktale-ish, as do the names (it’s not like they came up with Jakob and Elizabeth at random). It’s the sort of thing Rammstein would use for ideas.

    I haven’t read the Bible, nor am I required to, nor will I in the near future. Really, you could’ve just answered my question.
    Also, “embarrass yourself on the Internet” is an oxymoron.

    By the way, the guy above my post is not me…he’s from Canada…don’t know what his idea was.

  9. @Lily..
    LOL. Does it turn you on to “pretend” to be such a cunt?
    Go ahead, you like to answer questions, don’t you?
    :*

  10. @Feuersquare
    “By any chance, is there a Jacob/Elizabeth story in the Bible? Probably a long shot…but doesn’t hurt to try.”

    Sure. Idiot.

    P.S. Maybe you should actually read the Bible sometime. You know, just for general knowledge – not to embarrass yourself on the Internet and not to sound like a total moron… just a suggestion.

  11. The special edition of Liebe Ist für Alle Da contained a song at the end called ‘Liese’ that was essentially ‘Roter Sand’ with different instrumentation and entirely different lyrics. What is the connection between the two songs?

    Landers: The simple answer is that ‘Roter Sand’ is a result of the band’s continued development of ‘Liese.’ ‘Liese’ was the original song, and it was something that Ollie, Till and Flake came up with after a bottle of red wine. It took them a grand total of about eight minutes to come up with it, and ‘Roter Sand’ was the result of the band working on it and developing it. It’s like the brother song to ‘Liese.’ Some of the band members said, ‘No, leave it. “Liese” is the better one,’ and another fraction said, ‘No, the new version is much better,’ so the only choice was to put both versions on there.

    http://www.regenmag.com/Interviews-307-Rammstein.html

  12. By any chance, is there a Jacob/Elizabeth story in the Bible? Probably a long shot…but doesn’t hurt to try.

  13. You know what… It’s just a song. I reckon you’ve all spent a lot more time interpreting meanings in this than Rammstein did writing it. With their habit of vague lyrics – I think interpretations are more based on what people WANT the song to mean. Thanks for the insight into your minds people.

  14. Most of you have already said what’s important, but the translation hasn’t been edited yet :/
    c’mon, fix it…

    I’ll point up some things again:
    by ELGORE:
    1) Goldflut must be seen in relation to Weizenfeld because wheatfields are golden. It’s not a a metaphor for the womb.
    2) “-chen” is the diminutive suffix” – Right, but not a metaphor for her genitalia. It is just meant as belittlement.

    by EDRANA:
    “bist Du freundlich nicht zu mir” is just an old poetic way to say “if you are not nice to me”

    by SILARIAL:
    Liese is a german female name. But yes it’s also oldschool. It’s often used in Old german fairy tales, the girl who looks after the geese is very often called “Gänse-Liese” It is a short form from Elisabeth, which was a popular name in the past.

    MY VERSION, but since English isn’t my mother tongue, I’m not sure if it’s all correct:

    Sunday at the Meadow Bunting
    Liese shepherds (over) Geese upright
    That’s when Jakob comes up running
    holding a scythe in his hand

    Which he slips now and then
    under Liesie’s* skirt and corset [“Liese-junior”, for God sake, fix it]
    He wants to taste her, wants to force her
    and at the same time the lad will sing

    Dear Liese, let the geese be
    I want to try (off) your skin
    Blood will turn the scythe rusty
    if you are not nice to me

    Jakob is allowed to lick from Liese
    and she will taste like pear
    Small hairs making goose bumps (??)
    as they hurry to the wheatfield

    In the gold flood hidden well
    He has infected Liese
    He held her till the evening tightly
    and sung into the child

    Dear Liese, let the geese be
    I want to try (off) your skin
    Blood will turn the scythe rusty
    if you are not nice to me

    Dear Liese, let the geese be
    I want to try (off) your skin
    Blood will turn the scythe rusty
    if you are not nice to me

  15. I think if the “scythe” metaphor had been replaced with something more obiously phallic, I would interpret the song as being about underage sex.

    However, the scythe imagery is formidable, not to mention the “rusty with blood” extension. I am not sure it refers to rape (“he is allowed to lick Lieschen”).

    If we were to continue the interpretation that this is being told as if a children’s story, then the scythe metaphor could be one of those “cautionary tale” things where it is implied that messing around with a “Jakob’s scythe” is very very dangerous.

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