Rammstein Mein Land lyrics with English translation

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Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh mit mir von Ost nach Süd I’m going from East to South
 
Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh mit mir von Süd nach West I’m going from South to West
 
Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh mit mir von West nach Nord I’m going from North to West
 
Da kommt er angerannt As he comes running
Mit der Fahne in der Hand With the flag in his hand
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
 
Du bist hier im meinem Land You’re here in my country
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
 
Du bist hier im meinem Land You’re here in my country
Mein Land My country
 
Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh mit mir von Nord nach Ost I go with me from North to East
 
Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh mit mir von Ost nach West I go with me from East to West
 
Wohin gehst du, wohin? Where are you going, where?
Ich geh von Land zu Land allein I go from country to country alone
 
Und nichts und niemand And nothing and nobody
lädt mich zum bleiben ein ever invites me to stay
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
 
Du bist hier in meinem Land You’re here in my country
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
 
Du bist hier im meinem Land You’re here in my country
Meine Welle und mein Strand My waves and my beach
Jaaaaaaaaaah Jaaaaaaaaaah
 
Eine Stimme aus dem Licht A voice from out of the light
Fällt dem Himmel vom Gesicht falls down from heavens face
Reisst den Horizont entzwei Tears the horizon in two
Wohin gehst du, hier ist nichts mehr frei Wherever you go, there’s nothing left free
 
Das ist mein Land This is my land
Das ist mein Land This is my land
Das ist mein Land This is my land
 
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
Du bist hier in meinem Land You’re here in my country
 
Mein Land, Mein Land My Country, My Country
Du bist hier in meinem Land You’re here in my country
Meine Welle und mein Strand My wave and my beach
Mein Land My country
 
Vertrieben, Mein Land expelled (from), My Country
Vertreiben, Mein Land Banished (from), My Country
Vergessen, Mein Land Forgotten, My Country
Nirgends kann ich bleiben Nowhere can I stay
Mein Land My country
 
Lyric © Rammstein Translation © Affenknecht.com

Translation submitted by RAK. Thank you.

 

72 COMMENTS

        • He’s saying that Germans feel they can’t be themselves anywhere, even when they leave their home country. They don’t have much identity since they are told to devalue their past and perpetually be ashamed of themselves. In Germany, it is frowned upon (borderline illegal) to have national pride. If other nations see a German who is proud to be German, they instantly are suspicious of them and label them as a word that most people throw around too easily these days…

          • I’m from England and have 1 English friend (been here since birth), I have no religion and go to bars and clubs. If you want to see real fascist people then look at the English. They invented racism and white supremacy. They went to foreign countries and took slaves and anyone who was not white were labeled savages, murdered and burnt. In Hitlers Germany Jesse Owen could sit anywhere on buses and mingle freely but in USA there was segregation. Australians (AKA British colonizers) were burning blacks alive. Need I speak of South Africa and what they were doing to black people. Hitler was allied with Japanese (non-white) also allied with Arabs (Mufti of Israel). Racist British had buildings in India with signs that read “no dogs no Indians.”So makes me think who were the real Nazis. History is written by the victors. When I was in Australia, I made friends easily with Germans and fellow British wouldn’t even bother. Tolerance is not acceptance when your English. I’m Asian by the way

  1. Isn´t the lyric wrong at the sixth row from the beginning?
    “Ich geh mit mir von West nach Nord” “I’m going from North to West”

  2. sample in the background sounds like a turkish song so i also think this is about immigration. look up for Gastarbeiter in 60’s.

  3. In my opinion, as most rammstein musics, this one is quite ironic.
    Whoever thinks this is anti-immigration has to take Irony classes.

    • You clearly don’t have any idea how things are in Europe right now (and how they were already at the time this song was written). What don’t you get about that last part of the song?

      “Expelled (from), My Country

      Banished (from), My Country

      Forgotten, My Country

      Nowhere can I stay” – this is what’s happening to Europeans as we are flooded by wave after wave of illegal immigrants.

  4. globalization is where all caucasian people become black, the most dominant DNA will remain (African DNA) this is our punishment for the Nazi’s losing WWII. The Jews are slowly taking away our identity, its done slowly so you don’t see the change within your life time! it will happen in a hundreed years or so if not stopped.

    • “The Jews are slowly taking away our identity.” Perhaps so, but the Jews are also acquiring some of our identities. It’s a two way street. We are both giving up on our respective religions and intermarrying, so there is a chance that, in a few hundred years, we’ll be all one.

  5. I think that lyric could be about the Berlin Wall. I’ve been reading “Berlin, 1961” and the lyrics make sense…
    Till, Landers, Kruspe, Schneider, Flake and Riedel was born in “DDR”… They’re against this politics about “no immigration”. All of them we’re when the wall fall down! By the way, all Germany are against “no immigration politics”…

    (sorry for my band english)

  6. I see alot of people actually think its against immigration, if that where the case, Rammstein would be a dead band by now.
    The song is a parody on anti-immigrationists and xenophobia.

  7. it’s just a song, no deep meaning, we don’t need to see your domesticated opinions so go and Rammstein up your arse

  8. I have a feeling this song may be perhaps about the Berlin Wall and the Communists in Germany. When the wall was still around one could not freely go from one place to another in Germany. Seeing as the members of the band all grew up in Communist East Germany it would make much sense to write a song in which they denounce the communists. Also the line in which Till says “Eine Stimme aus dem Licht/ Fällt dem Himmel vom Gesicht/ Reisst den Horizont entzwei/ Wohin gehst du, hier ist nichts mehr frei” Could be the voice of the major world powers that cut the horizon of Germany into two (East and West) and now no one is free to do quiet what they wish.

  9. There are no Hispanics in the video – I noticed…and it was set in California. I think it kind of points out that countries like some types of immigrants, but not others.

  10. Rammstein has always done a great job of using the perspective of an individual for their lyrics. In this case, it’s a conversation between a flag-bearing nationalist against immigration who believes he has a mandate from the Heavens to kick immigrants out of his land and immigrants who enter his country (possibly Muslim if you consider the type of beat in the beginning of the song). Rammstein is not known to take pro right-wing stances (Links 2-3-4), so I believe it’s a criticism against anti-immigration, e.g. “Nowhere can I stay”, response: “My land”. They are known to make amazing poetry with controversy.

  11. I would say that their lyrics are both pro and con anti-immigration feelings. They ridicolize nationalism, but in the meantime they understand it’s reasons and lift the problem of over-immigration which Germany is facing.

  12. It’s interesting how Rammstein manages all the time to satisfy both sides. Fueling both nationalists to listen to their songs but also stepping out of the line of fire from being called nazis, nationalists, etc.

    From my point of view, the lyrics indeed speak of the “greed” of nationalists casting out other non-peers; but on the other hand the lyrics tune and focus on the chanting “Mein Land!” which is self sufficient in a song to emit a message. Remember this is not a logical experience – you feel and relate to the song more than you can understand by putting the lyrics head to head.

    Same story is with Links and other songs. Its right there on the edge of the knife, you cannot say it’s definitely one way or the other, it just molds on your own mental perspective and makes you happy with the song. (with or without being a “nationalist”)

    As for public statements from the band, i’m pretty sure they say what the media wants them to say, especially in Germany where everybody is paranoid with their image not being identified with the former National Socialist party.

    (Hell, i remember this game, Hearts of Iron, an historical strategy game – they wanted to remove Hitler and his portrait and replace it with a fictional character just because they didn’t want to encourage nazi propaganda.)

    • That’s exactly what I thought when I heard it, but you articulated it way better than I ever could. Rammstein is first and foremost a quitessentially German entertainment vehicle in full limelight and, as such, must be extremely careful not to jeopardize their image, public relations an their botom line. By playing metal, singing with a militaristic tone of voice (ironic or not), utilizing key words from the nationalist vocabulary they can sing a nursery rhyme and still convey a totalitarian message however subliminal or subconscious. This is art, and art, as we know, will always carry multiple levels of interpretations. So Rammstein don’t need explicit lyrics to slip in a multitude of contradictory messages. The form alone suffices. Just as it was the case with Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. Lang was a Jew, his movie was ostentatiously anti-Nazi and Adolf still loved it. And you couldn’t even say he was mistaken since Lang’s wife, Thea von Harbou who also wrote the script, was a member of the NSDAP.

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